Myopia and the Macula

Nearsighted individuals can develop problems in the center part of the vision. Very nearsighted individuals can develop thinning in the macula which is the center part of the retina. The macula is necessary for our finest detailed vision. Sometimes the thinning can disturb one of the layers of the retina which functions as a barrier between the underlying blood vessels in the choroid and the retina itself. Just like cracks in a pavement these thin areas can grow ‘weeds’ (new blood vessels). In fact a lot of pathologies in the macula that we treat have as there common path new blood vessel formation. Wet macular degeneration patients being the obvious example, here new blood vessel formation results from progressive degenerative change where age is the greatest risk factor.

The good news for myopic individuals is oftentimes their prognosis is better for their macula degeneration compared with their wet AMD counterparts. Patients with myopic choroidal neovascularization (new blood vessel formation or cnv) may experience distortion or a blur in their central vision. Oftentimes patients in this situation are extremely sensitive to any changes in their vision. If a patient has myopic CNV the standard of care is intravitreal medications (medications delivered inside the eye). Thankfully myopic patients often respond very well to treatment and can continue to enjoy good central vision for a long period of time. If you are extremely nearsighted it is important to get regular eye checks and if your ophthalmologist suspects myopic macular degeneration a retina specialist evaluation is always reasonable.

Henry Holt, MD
1801 N.H. Medical Park Drive
Wilmington, N.C. 28403